May Newsletter and Meeting Notice

Our next meeting will be Monday, May 18th, at 7 PM, at the Lowell Center, corner of Frances and Langdon Streets, Madison. Check kiosk for room.

Nearest parking ramp is the Lakes Street ramp between Lake and Frances. Parking is free on the street after 6. City of Madison Parking Website:  www.cityofmadison.com/transportation/parking.cfm
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At around 7:10 we will read:

“The Reality of the Virtual” ………………….. by Chris Wolter :20
“Dear Donna” ……………………………………. by Allen Youngwood :15
Gadzooks, Cinderella (act 2) ………………. by Nick Schweitzer :40

We always need women to read.

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In April we read:
“Shaun’s Happy Hour” ………………………….. by Deb Meyer
Lick and Sniff – A Sundance Romance” ……. by Allen Youngwood
“Not a Prayer” (episode)…………………………. by Phil Heckman and Bob Curry
Gadzooks, Cinderella …………………………….. by Nick Schweitzer

Readers were Suzan Kurry, Kathy Tissot, Georgia Curry, Greg Hudson
Brendon Smith, Deb Meyer, Russ Tomar, Alan Gold, Mark Lajiness, George Farah, Phil Heckman, Nick Schweitzer, Bob Curry
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Dramatic action, therefore, is not with a view to the representation of character: character comes in as subsidiary to the actions.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics
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ANNOUNCEMENTS and OPPORTUNITIES
New Works of Merit Playwriting Contest is accepting scripts
through June 30, 2015 (Email Submission Date)

For Guidelines and Application Form go to:
http://www.NewWorksOfMeritPlaywritingContest.com
Award:
$300 + a reading and Q&A in a professional theatre

Join our Face Book Group:
New Works of Merit Playwriting Contest

As writers, we have been given a precious gift.  Let us use that gift to create powerful
new works that not only entertain, but also educate, enlighten, and uplift humanity.

You are on this group because you either requested to be, or you were recommended
by a colleague or industry professional.

Please note that your information and email address will not be shared with anyone.

If you wish to Unsubscribe from this group, mark Unsubscribe in the Subject
Line of the email.  Upon receipt, your email address will be promptly deleted.

We look forward to receiving your script.

Sincerely,
Literary Staff
New Works of Merit Playwriting Contest
– Thanks, Marcia Jablonski
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Six playwrights engaged in a pilot program to help, encourage, and improve their writing. We met about twice a month, two and one half to three hours each session, for a period of three months. Two works in progress of about 30 pages each were read followed by constructive feedback from the other members. The manuscripts were made available at least seven days prior to the meeting. We paid two actors to read at each session. At the completion of the pilot, we met to evaluate our experience. It was so positive that the six writers decided to go forward with another six week experience. If there is interest, I would be willing to help another group get started. To learn more, contact Russ Tomar.
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For immediate Release: January 15, 2015

Contact: Coni Koepfinger, director

“AirPlay with OnAir Players”
– weekly radio theatre –
http://www.onairplayers.com

Producer : Rachel Love
Hosts : Coni Koepfinger & Joe Izen
On Air Players Hosts: Lani Cataldi
& Jim Hetrick

Created and directed by Coni Koepfinger
Core Creative team :
Joe Izen, Lani Cerveris, Jim Hetrick and Rachel Love

Mission & Vision:
To light the way for changing perspectives that may solve the problems that plague society at large and challenge our prosperity and joy by carving a new path for the creative process in these new virtual landscapes of social media.

At Airplay– we do development with new drama by reading scenes in a virtual studio .

No boundaries….here’s how it works:
typically we allow the writers to chose one or two scenes and then give the play to actors to read with focus on those specific scenes.

We schedule one rehearsal which is recorded for immediate playback to see what we need to amend for clarity then we follow up with one recording session.

After the scene is read, there is an optional talkback with our “OnAir Players ” host, Lani Cerveris – this is not rehearsed but a short preliminary discussion is helpful. The discussion is prepped but not tightly scripted.

The broadcast :
Our producer, Rachel Love, was so excited about our inaugural program that she bought and built a website for us.  www.onairplayers.com
The shows will also be linked with other sources as well, like FutureVision in L.A.

For actors :
Experimental Collaboration is not only essential but fun- and it is nice to meet and work briefly with other actors from all over the globe… Like in one show we have a cast that spans totally across the country from NYC to Kansas to L.A. Also actors get to explore their range of imagination and play outside their type because it’s radio so physicality matters not! Great exercise – Pilates for the actors mind and voice!

For playwrights:
It’s an amazingly strong tool to test character, plot and theme- even in a short scene when you breathe life into it and hit playback it seems to give it that page to stage rush to infuse the work even for a brief time.

For society;
Airplay is the world’s first virtual public library for the living word. Therefore it is a volunteer project – no one is compensated financially but actors and writers come away with a product that they can use for their own self-promotion… Again we are building a living anthology of new drama that will help raise the consciousness of humanity today –and we are putting it out there for public scrutiny!

The last section of our program includes our “new view review” – here we bring in critical analysis by all sorts of professionals in various fields – from theatre, of course and psychology and physics and philosophy and others.

If you would like to join us, please feel free to contact Coni Koepfinger.
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The Edgewood Theater Department has offered to make its new black box theater available for public readings of plays that have been read at P.I. meetings and that are ready for the stage.  If you have a work that you want to have considered, and if you are willing to do most of the work of casting, rehearsing, and producing, contact Nick Schweitzer, who will act as liaison with Edgewood.
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CONTESTS AND SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITIES
Philip Seymour Hoffman award gives new playwright $45K and coast-to-coast exposure: Deadline July 10
http://www.timeout.com/newyork/blog/philip-seymour-hoffman-award-gives-new-playwright-45k-and-coast-to-coast-exposure

Thanks, Susan Hering
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Another resource. Thanks, Betty Diamond:

Welcome to The Playwrights’ Center’s Writer’s Opportunities listings, the nation’s best collection of information for working dramatists. We do the research so our member playwrights can spend more time focused on writing. This extensive database of information contains information on contests, theaters, publication and submission opportunities. We add opportunities and search categories weekly to keep the information up-to-date and easy to search.
http://www.pwcenter.org/members-opportunities.php
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BBC Radio Dramas:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/programmes/genres/drama/player
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New Submission Calendar:
http://www.womenarts.org/funding-resources/theatre-ongoing-calls/
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The Playwrights’ Center

2301 East Franklin Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55406-1099
http://www.pwcenter.org/
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Playwrights Foundation
http://www.playwrightsfoundation.org/
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The Playwrights Project
http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Plot-Line—WordPlay–PiP—-More-.html?soid=1102494320324&aid=5N4hi_k4A2g

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Written and Edited by Lindsay Price
Marketing Your Play
https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/marketing-your-play
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Articles and Reviews
Reality Show
A new guard of women in experimental theatre.
BY HILTON ALS
To hear theatre people who don’t necessarily aspire to Broadway tell it, two vital talents making an indelible mark on the downtown theatre scene are Julia Jarcho and Sibyl Kempson. Both playwrights direct as well (Kempson also performs). In works like Jarcho’s “Nomads” and Kempson’s “Bad Girls, Good Writers,” they construct worlds that are explicitly feminist and story-driven. But their narratives aren’t linear; that would be untrue to their view of how experience plays out. If anything, these artists are attuned to the mad leaps in logic that make everyday communication a spectacle, if you listen. To Continue Reading:
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/05/04/reality-show

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Advice for Robert Downey, Jr.
BY RICHARD BRODY
The New Yorker, May 14, 2015

From an interview with Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu:

I think there’s nothing wrong with being fixated on superheroes when you are seven years old, but I think there’s a disease in not growing up.
The enormous sums of money to be made on superhero movies are drying up the streams of financing as well as the prospect for distribution of lower-budget non-action films.

They have been poison, this cultural genocide, because the audience is so overexposed to plot and explosions and shit that doesn’t mean nothing about the experience of being human.

It’s a false, misleading conception, the superhero. Then, the way they apply violence to it, it’s absolutely right-wing. If you observe the mentality of most of those films, it’s really about people who are rich, who  have power, who will do the good, who will kill the bad. Philosophically, I just don’t like them. To Continue Reading:

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/advice-for-robert-downey-jr-avengers-ultron-cultural-genocide?intcid=mod-yml

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Raj Recall
BY IAN PARKER, The New Yorker,
A day or two after “Indian Ink,” by Tom Stoppard, began its first full-scale New York run, twenty years after opening in London, the playwright had lunch with Rosemary Harris, the play’s star, at Karahi, on Christopher Street, beneath an image of Krishna on a golden chariot.

To Continue Reading:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/20/raj-recall
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The Money Shot

Four plays about haves and have-nots. April 20, 2015

BY HILTON ALS

Because “Skylight” (in revival at the Golden, directed by Stephen Daldry), was written by David Hare, the romance—or old romance—at its center is indivisible from money, class, and politics. It’s a vaguely sour piece, and a periodically platitudinous one, too, marked by Hare’s residual Thatcher-era indignation. To Continue Reading:
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/04/20/the-money-shot-theatre-hilton-als
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APRIL 13, 2015
Reading Racist Literature
BY ELIF BATUMAN

This is the basic dramatic situation: a black playwright, in 2014, is somehow unable to move beyond a likeable 1859 work, named after a forgotten word once used to describe nonwhite people in the same terms as breeds of livestock. What do you do with your mixed feelings toward a text that treats as stage furniture the most grievous and unhealed insult in American history—especially when you belong to the insulted group?

To Continue Reading:

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/reading-racist-literature?mbid=rss

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The Middle of Things: Advice for Young Writers

BY ANDREW SOLOMON

The following is adapted from a speech the author gave at the Whiting Writers’ Awards on March 5th.
When I had just finished my schooling and was looking for a job, a friend put me in touch with an absurdly well-connected British biographer who, she assured me, would help me find the professional position of my dreams. I wrote and asked him whether we might meet, explaining that I would appreciate his advice on securing literary work and enclosing some of my early efforts. He duly invited me for tea. The advice I had in mind sounded like this: “You must call so-and-so at this number and say I suggested it and he will publish you and give you loads of money.” After giving me a cup of weak tea—no sandwiches, no pastry, not even sugar or milk—he said, “I have only one piece of advice for you. Have a vision and cleave to it.” We then discussed the weather for twenty minutes. To Continue Reading:
http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-middle-of-things-advice-for-young-writers?intcid=mod-most-popular

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Branden Jacobs-Jenkins Is, and Is Not, Writing About Race
By ALEX WITCHELNOV. 21, 2014
“You realize it’s backing up,” Branden Jacobs-Jenkins said casually, as I turned around, midstreet, to find myself within two inches of a moving car. “No,” I managed, suddenly terrified, forgetting about the notes I had been taking. Jacobs-Jenkins touched my elbow, and his smile reassured me to start breathing again. “Not today,” he intoned, as I slid out of harm’s way and into Blue State Coffee in New Haven, Conn. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/magazine/branden-jacobs-jenkins-isnt-writing-about-race.html?_r=1
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A Civil War Story With a Twist

A Review of ‘The Whipping Man’ in New Brunswick
By KEN JAWOROWSKI   NYTFEB. 6, 2015

The whole is not as powerful as the best parts of “The Whipping Man” at the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick. Here, you’ll sit through intense scenes and inert sections, in a production that is both laudable and lackluster.
To continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/nyregion/a-review-of-the-whipping-man-in-new-brunswick.html
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Review: ‘Everything You Touch,’ a Brash Examination of Self-Image

By ALEXIS SOLOSKI NYTFEB. 12, 2015

The work of the playwright Sheila Callaghan is not exactly ready-to-wear. Her plots don’t progress along expected lines; her characters don’t stick to a single style. There’s a lot of color and a lot of pattern and some pretty crazy layering. to continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/13/theater/review-everything-you-touch-a-brash-examination-of-self-image.html
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Review: ‘Rasheeda Speaking’ Finds a Chilling Place to Work
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD       NYTFEB. 11, 2015
Office politics are a headache for anyone working in the land of cubicles, copiers and water coolers, but they rarely rise to the four-alarm-fire levels of tension on view in “Rasheeda Speaking,” an incendiary but improbable play by Joel Drake Johnson that rather ham-handedly raises ever-topical (sigh) questions about the prevalence of ingrained racism in America. to continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/12/theater/review-rasheeda-speaking-finds-a-chilling-place-to-work.html
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THEATER | THEATER REVIEW

Fusillades Piercing a Fog of Dementia

‘Visitors,’ Barney Norris’s Play About Alzheimer’s

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD JAN. 2, 2015

LONDON — For Edie and Arthur, an English couple who have lived together on a farm for some 40 years, life’s final horizon seems to have reared up with an alarming suddenness. The days and years have passed by uneventfully for this contented and very settled pair, for whom even holidays were rare events. But now Edie’s mind has begun to falter. She can’t move very well, but more distressingly, words don’t come as easily as they once did, and when they do, they may not be the ones intended.

[…]

First seen here early last year, the play has been remounted with the director, Alice Hamilton, and the superb original cast intact at the Bush Theater, one of London’s fertile incubators of new playwriting. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/03/theater/visitors-barney-norriss-play-about-alzheimers.html

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A Big-Minded Playwright Pares Down

Moira Buffini on ‘Dying for It’ at Atlantic Theater
By ALEXIS SOLOSKIDEC. 27, 2014

Between matinee and evening performances of the comedy “Dying for It” at the Atlantic Theater, the British playwright Moira Buffini slouched in a plush seat with a cup of milky tea and squinted up at the ramshackle set. She’d flown into town only the day before to help steer the play, which opens on Jan. 8, through previews. Already she’d hit a roadblock.
“I have to take all the swearing out,” she said. “I think it sounds wrong.”
In Britain, she explained, obscenities are just “salt and pepper” enlivening everyday language. But here, “swearing is really shocking.” (Shh! No one tell David Mamet.) To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/28/theater/moira-buffini-on-dying-for-it-at-atlantic-theater.html

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Resources :
The National New Play Network   is an alliance of leading nonprofit theaters that champion the development,  production and continued life of new plays. NNPN strives to pioneer, implement and disseminate ideas and programs that  revolutionize the way theaters collaborate to support new plays and playwrights.
http://www.nnpn.org/ about_mission.php
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E-Plays available for download from Sam French

http://www.samuelfrench.com/store/ebooks.php
Winning Writers  Website: More for fiction and poetry writers, but all kinds of good, well-paying contests.

Winning Writers
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The Dramatists Guild of America   was established over eighty years ago, and is the only professional association which advances the interests of playwrights, composers, lyricists and librettists writing for the living stage. The Guild has over 6,000 members nationwide, from beginning writers to the most prominent authors represented on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theaters.
The Guild is governed by a Board of Directors elected from its membership, and which currently includes such writers as Stephen Sondheim ( West Side Story, Gypsy, Into the Woods ), Edward Albee ( Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, A Delicate Balance ), Marsha Norman (‘ night, mother ), Tony Kushner ( Angels In America ), John Patrick Shanley ( Doubt ), John Guare ( Six Degrees of Separation ), Lynn Nottage ( Intimate Apparel ) and Rebecca Gilman ( Spinning Into Butter ). The current president of the Guild is Stephen Schwartz ( Wicked, Pippin, Godspell ). Past presidents have included Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Sherwood, Robert Anderson, Frank Gilroy, and Peter Stone. Past Guild members have included Eugene O’Neill, George S. Kaufman, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Frank Loesser, Frederick Loewe, and Tennessee Williams.
The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work. The Guild believes that a vibrant, vital and provocative theater is an essential element of the ongoing cultural debate which informs the citizens of a free society. The Guild believes that if such a theater is to survive, the unique, idiosyncratic voices of both men and women who write for it must be cultivated and protected.
To that end, the Guild maintains model contracts for all levels of productions, (including Broadway, regional and smaller theaters) and encourages its members to use these contracts when negotiating with producers. These contracts embody the Guild’s over­arching objectives of protecting the dramatist’s control over the content of his work, and ensuring that the dramatist is compensated for each use of his work in a way which will encourage him to continue writing for the living stage.

In addition to its contract services, the Guild acts as an aggressive public advocate for dramatists’ interests and assists dramatists in developing both their artistic and business skills through its publications, which are distributed nationally, and the educational programs which it sponsors around the country.
Through a variety of activities, the Dramatists Guild of America works to ensure that theater in America will continue to flourish and that the voices which give it life will continue to reflect and celebrate the richness and diversity of the American experience.

http://www.dramatistsguild.com/

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dmoz, open directory project
http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Writers_Resources/Playwriting/
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Playwriting Opportunities
http://www.playwritingopportunities.com/Playwriting_Theatre_Resources.htm
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Play Publishers:
Below is a short list of play publishers. Browse their online catalogs to see if your play will be a good fit before querying. I’ve noted the ones that have contests or other special instructions. Click the publisher’s name to go the submission guidelines page.

Baker’s Plays – e-queries OK, has a contest for high school students, markets to religious institutions, regional theatres, universities, high schools and children’s/family theatres.
Broadway Play Publishing, Inc. – e-queries OK, full-length plays only.
Brooklyn Publishers – e-queries OK, NO musicals, markets mainly to middle, junior high and high schools.
Dramatists Play Service, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, all plays/musicals must have a production history.
Pioneer Drama Service – e-queries OK, has a contest, markets to schools and “family-oriented theatres.”
Samuel French, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, has a contest, markets to amateur and regional theatres, prefers plays/musicals appropriate for family, junior and high school markets, though will consider plays with more adult themes if they have had successful productions.

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The History of Playwrights Ink can be accessed and read at the Madison Public Library (main branch) on 201 West Mifflin St. in the Local Material File (Pamphlet File ) on the first floor. The file lists Associations alphabetically.

You may also access Playwrights Ink History and read it at the University of Wisconsin Memorial Library, 728 State St. It is cataloged so people will know it’s available and can be found and used there in the Madison Archives.

Should you have any problem locating our files, speak to a librarian. No material may be removed from these libraries regarding the History of Playwrights Ink. Please return info exactly where you found it.

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Playwrights Ink Participation: Anyone is welcome to attend Playwrights Ink monthly meetings (second Monday, 7PM). If you want a play or scene read, you must pay the $10 annual dues and contact Bob Curry to get it in the schedule. If you have any issues or concerns about the group’s activities or governance, would like to post an item in the monthly newsletter, or want help finding actors to read your play at the monthly meeting, contact Nick Schweitzer.

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