December Newsletter and Meeting Notice

Our next meeting will be Monday, December 15th, at 7 PM, at the Lowell Center, corner of Langdon and Frances Streets, Madison. Check kiosk for room.

Parking: Parking on street is free after 6 PM. The closest ramp is between Lake and Frances.

City of Madison Parking Website:  www.cityofmadison.com/transportation/parking.cfm

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Starting around 7:10 we will read:
Widow’s Walk (scenes) ……………… by Carol O Smart :30
Violence of the Education ………….. by Christopher Wolter 1:00
“Shauna’s Happy Hour” …………….. by Deb Meyer :07
“Radio Play” (unfinished) …………… by Nick Schweitzer :10
“Faith” (fragmentary)………………….. by Nick Schweitzer :10


* * * * * *   Playwrights: please cast our volunteer actors first.  * * * * * *
* * * * * *   We always need women to read.   * * * * * *

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In November we read:

Violence of the Education (act 1) ….. by Christopher Wolter
“A Trophy for Atrophy” ………………… by Jason Compton
“All Nighter” ………………………………. by Jo Krukowski

Readers were: Katie Erdmann, Laura Damon Moore, Jo Krukowski, Claire Mason, Bridgett Vanderhoof, Yang Gil sp?), Scott Harmon, Jason Compton, Christopher Wolter

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The Way of Art
by Albert Huffstickler

It seems to me that
paralleling the paths of action, devotion, etc.,
there is a path called art
and that the sages of the East would recognize
Faulkner, Edward Hopper, Beethoven, William Carlos Williams
and address them as equals.
It’s a matter of attention and discipline, isn’t it?—
combined with a certain God-given ability.
It’s what you’re willing to go through, willing to give, isn’t it?
It’s the willingness to be a window
through which others can see
all the way out to infinity
and all the way back to themselves.
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ANNOUNCEMENTS and OPPORTUNITIES
To Members of Playwrights Ink:
I am working with Friends of Unitarian Universalists and The Madison Institute on a new low-power FM radio station, WMUU. I am the Program Director and want to produce regular, contemporary radio dramas.
We hope to get WMUU on the air in early Fall.  The main studio will be located at 122 State St., home of The Fountain, and we will reach a 10-mile radius. Programs will also be podcast.

Kelly Warren
We’ll keep you updated on this potential opportunity.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/programmes/genres/drama/player
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The Edgewood Theater Department has offered to make its new black box theater available for public readings of plays that have been read at P.I. meetings and that are ready for the stage.  If you have a work that you want to have considered, and if you are willing to do most of the work of casting, rehearsing, and producing, contact Nick Schweitzer, who will act as liaison with Edgewood.
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MEMBER NEWS
If you are in a show, directing a show, have written a show being produced somewhere, let me know and I’ll put it in the newsletter and you may post it on our Facebook page.
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Spoke, by Coleman, reviewed in Isthmus
http://www.isthmus.com/daily/article.php?article=41125
http://www.spokesinthewheel.com

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Coleman’s novel  Kidnapping Henry Kissinger is available at Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/ Kidnapping-Henry-Kissinger- ebook/dp/B0078PWPDA/ref=sr_1_ 1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331048524&sr=8- 1

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CONTESTS AND SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITIES
***Since the previous submission calendar link redirects you to a Japanese pop-porn site, here’s a new one … looks like a lot of interesting opportunities for submission***
http://www.womenarts.org/funding-resources/theatre-ongoing-calls/
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Sanguine Theatre Company Now Accepting Submissions for Annual Project Playwright Competition
From October 15 through November 30, Sanguine Theatre Company will accept submissions for its annual Project Playwright Competition. The winner of the competition receives a fully-produced world premiere of their play in New
York City as a part of Sanguine’s 2015 season. to continue reading:

http://www.broadwayworld.com/off-off-broadway/article/Sanguine-Theatre-Company-Now-Accepting-Submissions-for-Annual-Project-Playwright-Competition-20141016
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Another resource. Thanks, Betty Diamond:

Welcome to The Playwrights’ Center’s Writer’s Opportunities listings, the nation’s best collection of information for working dramatists. We do the research so our member playwrights can spend more time focused on writing. This extensive database of information contains information on contests, theaters, publication and submission opportunities. We add opportunities and search categories weekly to keep the information up-to-date and easy to search.
http://www.pwcenter.org/members-opportunities.php
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BBC Radio Dramas:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/programmes/genres/drama/player
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New Submission Calendar:
http://www.womenarts.org/funding-resources/theatre-ongoing-calls/
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The Playwrights’ Center

2301 East Franklin Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55406-1099
http://www.pwcenter.org/
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Playwrights Foundation
http://www.playwrightsfoundation.org/
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The Playwrights Project
http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Plot-Line—WordPlay–PiP—-More-.html?soid=1102494320324&aid=5N4hi_k4A2g

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Written and Edited by Lindsay Price
Marketing Your Play
https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/marketing-your-play
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Articles and Reviews
The Best Movies of 2014
BY RICHARD BRODY
http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/best-movies-2014?intcid=mod-most-popular
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We Call That Failure Art
BY TONY KUSHNER
The following is quoted by Kushner in a speech the author gave at the Whiting Writers’ Awards on October 21, 2013.
It is not a derogation but only a definition to say that workable theatricality is the measure of successful playwriting. In the theater the test is not: Is this true to the realities of human experience? Instead the test is: Is this fictitious representation satisfactory to the artificial conditions of the theater? With luck—or with genius—a play may pass both tests, but it must pass the second, and if they are in conflict, the first must yield. The theater is under many limitations: the exigencies of space and time; the dictation of the literal, which requires an actual Peter Pan to swing through the air on an actual wire in the presence of practicable props; and especially the necessary conditions of people meeting together as an audience, the lowered intelligence, the lulled critical faculty, the enhanced emotionalism and suggestibility of a group, the substitution of emotional accord for the desire to experience and understand that is fed by other forms of literature. Under all these limitations, the theater succeeds in its own terms. They are the terms of the momentarily effective, not the permanently true or the permanently illuminating. Only small and superficial portions of human life can be honestly and thoroughly represented in such terms and under such limitations. Quite properly, the theater does not care: where honest and thorough presentation of life makes available material, the theater will use it; where it does not, the theater must and will cheerfully depart from it for the sake of the theatrical values. They, the theatrical values, are concerned with something else. To continue reading:​
http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/we-call-that-failure-art
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Just Saying

The anti-theatrical theatre of Annie Baker.

BY NATHAN HELLER

​Wh​o goes to the theatre these days, and why? For decades now, serious stage work has been regarded tenderly as the spotted owl of American art—brilliant and nimble, breathtaking in flight, but unlikely to be found beyond a few scarce habitats. Every time we watch a trite blockbuster, fall asleep in front of bad TV, or click through to a YouTube video of yawning pandas, it’s said, our capacity for theatrical attention dies a little more. And yet, for all that, the theatre has proved strangely resilient, selling (even selling out) cascades of seats and claiming more college degrees than film and clinical psychology combined. Something is going right. Perhaps the question isn’t why some give up on the form but why others keep falling in love. What can the theatre do that books and screens can’t?​ To continue reading:​
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/02/25/just-saying

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Movie Review:
Swinging Seventies
“Inherent Vice.”
BY ANTHONY LANE

​Th​e new Paul Thomas Anderson film, “Inherent Vice,” comes from the 2009 novel of that name, by Thomas Pynchon. The adaptation alone deserves an award for valor. Nobody has ever turned a Pynchon book into a movie before, for the same reason that nobody has managed to cram the New York Philharmonic into a Ford Focus. If you really have a mind to write a screenplay based on “Gravity’s Rainbow” (1973), go right ahead, but be warned: you won’t have a mind by the end of it. So, what possessed Anderson to approach “Inherent Vice”?​ ​
To continue reading:​
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/15/swinging-seventies-3?intcid=mod-most-popular

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When the Script Is Screaming for Blood Audiences See Red at ‘Tamburlaine’ and Other Plays
By LAURA COLLINS-HUGHESNOV. 13, 2014

The director Michael Boyd had plans for a small lake of blood. Onstage at the Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, during a break in rehearsal for “Tamburlaine, Parts I and II,” he pointed with his foot to the spot where he wanted a hole drilled. Through it, blood would be pumped from beneath the stage. If all went well, it would gradually creep up the skirt of a character standing there. “We’ve designed a costume that’s very absorbent,” he said. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/16/theater/audiences-see-red-at-tamburlaine.html?ref=arts
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Why the Theater Next Door Isn’t Fit for a Queen
Producers of ‘The Audience,’ With Helen Mirren, Won’t Move

By PATRICK HEALY, NOV. 11, 2014
How badly did the Broadway producers of “The Audience,” a coming play starring Helen Mirren, want their first-choice theater, the Schoenfeld? Enough to brush off rival producers who were prepared to pay them $400,000 for dibs on the house.  To continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/12/arts/producers-of-the-audience-with-helen-mirren-wont-move.html?ref=arts&_r=0

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Real Gone Girl
Young Jean Lee’s identity plays.
BY HILTON ALS,  THE NEW YORKER, NOVEMBER 3, 2014

A musty late-spring evening in Manhattan, 2012. The voluble and irrepressible playwright and director Young Jean Lee swiveled in her seat to take in the audience. The Korean-born Lee, who is now forty and has made a considerable name for herself on the downtown theatre scene, was far from her professional home. She was, in fact, on Broadway, at the Walter Kerr Theatre, on West Forty-eighth Street, waiting for a performance of Bruce Norris’s Pulitzer Prize-winning hit “Clybourne Park” to begin. Looking over all the middle-aged, suit-jacketed men and their well-heeled lady companions around her, Lee sort of shivered and said, “But everyone’s so old.” Although Norris’s play about convention, class, and race touched on themes that Lee had broken down and pieced back together at odd angles in her own work, his relatively traditional naturalism was a far cry from her irreverent, essayistic, collagist approach to storytelling, which makes her, for a range of theatre critics and audiences, a troubling, necessary presence. To continue reading:

http://WWW.NEWYORKER.COM/MAGAZINE/2014/11/03/REAL-GONE-GIRL?INTCID=MOD-YML
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Young Jean Lee Tackles ‘Straight White Men’
BY ELIZA BENT
After a recent pre-opening run-through of Young Jean Lee’s Straight White Men at Columbia University, the playwright and director, sporting distressed jeans and a leather jacket, posed questions to her audience. “Did you know what that character’s problem was?” she queried from a chair onstage. As onlookers replied, she listened intently and rapidly typed out responses on her laptop. “Did you think and feel beyond the family stuff? What did that scene make you question?” Lee pressed for answers with dramatic flair. At one point, an audience member was caught off-guard mid-response. “Forgive me,” said the accomplished monologist and veteran performer Mike Daisey. “I’m not used to dissecting a play in this way.” To continue reading:
http://americantheatre.org/2014/10/there-is-no-escape-for-or-from-young-jean-lee/

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‘Recipe’: Playwright salutes older women in political farce
By Chad Jones

San Francisco playwright and actor Michael Gene Sullivan had a compelling reason to create his play “Recipe,” which receives its world premiere from Berkeley’s Central Works: “I wanted to create roles for women of a certain age,” he says.

Sullivan points out that women rule in the theater, both in the audience and onstage, and yet women of that certain age — let’s say 50 and beyond — see onstage opportunities dwindling or being limited to the nutty aunt, the annoying granny or the lady who types a letter for the lawyers. to continue reading:
http://www.sfgate.com/performance/article/Recipe-Playwright-salutes-older-women-in-5825423.php
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Playwright speaks out about play canceled at local school
CATAWBA COUNTY, N.C. —

The playwright of one of the most performed plays in high schools across the country defended his storyline Thursday after learning a performance was cancelled at a Catawba County high school.

“Almost, Maine” is a romantic comedy that tells multiple love stories, including one between two men. to continue reading:
http://www.wsoctv.com/news/news/local/playwright-speaks-out-about-play-canceled-local-sc/nhkyB/
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‘Zealot’ at SCR continues playwright’s topical work

By Michael MillerOctober 16, 2014 | 5:02 p.m.

Given how quickly circumstances change around the globe, Theresa Rebeck’s new play may evoke some unplanned responses when it premieres at South Coast Repertory.

But if it does, Rebeck has been there before — and so has Marc Masterson, the Costa Mesa theater’s artistic director. to continue reading:

http://www.dailypilot.com/entertainment/tn-dpt-et-1017-theresa-rebeck-marc-masterson-south-20141016,0,1572257.story
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(stories from previous months)

Creating a Supply Chain of Work by Female Playwrights
Group Called the Kilroys Releases List of Plays by Women

By PATRICK HEALYJUNE 16, 2014
All but daring American theaters to put on more new plays by women, an advocacy group of female writers and producers released a list of 46 such works on Monday that have been recommended for production by dozens of other playwrights, dramaturges and artistic directors. To continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/17/theater/call-for-theaters-to-produce-more-plays-by-women.html

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Dan O’Brien and Suzan-Lori Parks Win Horton Foote Prize

By PATRICK HEALY SEPTEMBER 3, 2014

The playwrights Dan O’Brien and Suzan-Lori Parks are the 2014 recipients of the Horton Foote Prize, given every other year to honor excellence in American theater. The prize committee announced on Wednesday that Mr. O’Brien’s “The Body of an American” received the award for outstanding new American play, while “Father Comes Home From the Wars (Parts 1, 2, & 3)” by Ms. Parks was selected for promising new American play. To continue reading:
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/03/dan-obrien-and-suzan-lori-parks-win-horton-foote-prize/

 

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That Voice, and the Woman Attached

Lauren Bacall’s Debut in ‘To Have and Have Not’
By MANOHLA DARGIS AUG. 13, 2014

Her voice comes at you low and flat, wildly insinuating, electric and lingering. In another age, Lauren Bacall’s voice might have been called mannish. When she opened her mouth in “To Have and Have Not” — taking a long drag on a cigarette while locking Humphrey Bogart in her gaze — she staked a claim on the screen and made an immortal Hollywood debut. But in 1944 at the exquisitely tender age of 19, she was also projecting an indelible screen persona: that of the tough, quick-witted American woman who could fight the good fight alongside her man. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/14/movies/lauren-bacalls-debut-in-to-have-and-have-not.html?ref=arts&_r=0

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Busy Working, Robin Williams Fought Demons

By MICHAEL CIEPLY and BROOKS BARNESAUG. 12, 2014

LOS ANGELES — Peering through his camera at Robin Williams in 2012, the cinematographer John Bailey thought he glimpsed something not previously evident in the comedian’s work. They were shooting the independent film “The Angriest Man in Brooklyn,” and Mr. Williams was playing a New York lawyer who, facing death, goes on a rant against the injustice and banality of life.

His performance, Mr. Bailey said Tuesday, was a window into the “Swiftian darkness of Robin’s heart.” The actor, like his character, was raging against the storm.To continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/13/business/media/busy-working-robin-williams-fought-demons.html?contentCollection=movies&action=click&module=NextInCollection&region=Footer&pgtype=article

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Robin Williams, an Improvisational Genius, Forever Present in the Moment

By A. O. SCOTT AUG. 11, 2014

Some years ago, at a party at the Cannes Film Festival, I was leaning against a rail watching a fireworks display when I heard a familiar voice behind me. Or rather, at least a dozen voices, punctuating the offshore explosions with jokes, non sequiturs and off-the-wall pop-cultural, sexual and political references.To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/12/movies/robin-williams-an-improvisational-genius-forever-present-in-the-moment.html?action=click&contentCollection=Media&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article
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The National New Play Network   is an alliance of leading nonprofit theaters that champion the development,  production and continued life of new plays. NNPN strives to pioneer, implement and disseminate ideas and programs that  revolutionize the way theaters collaborate to support new plays and playwrights.
http://www.nnpn.org/ about_mission.php
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Resources :
E-Plays available for download from Sam French

http://www.samuelfrench.com/store/ebooks.php
Winning Writers  Website: More for fiction and poetry writers, but all kinds of good, well-paying contests.

Winning Writers
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The Dramatists Guild of America   was established over eighty years ago, and is the only professional association which advances the interests of playwrights, composers, lyricists and librettists writing for the living stage. The Guild has over 6,000 members nationwide, from beginning writers to the most prominent authors represented on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theaters.

The Guild is governed by a Board of Directors elected from its membership, and which currently includes such writers as Stephen Sondheim ( West Side Story, Gypsy, Into the Woods ), Edward Albee ( Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, A Delicate Balance ), Marsha Norman (‘ night, mother ), Tony Kushner ( Angels In America ), John Patrick Shanley ( Doubt ), John Guare ( Six Degrees of Separation ), Lynn Nottage ( Intimate Apparel ) and Rebecca Gilman ( Spinning Into Butter ). The current president of the Guild is Stephen Schwartz ( Wicked, Pippin, Godspell ). Past presidents have included Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Sherwood, Robert Anderson, Frank Gilroy, and Peter Stone. Past Guild members have included Eugene O’Neill, George S. Kaufman, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Frank Loesser, Frederick Loewe, and Tennessee Williams.

The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work. The Guild believes that a vibrant, vital and provocative theater is an essential element of the ongoing cultural debate which informs the citizens of a free society. The Guild believes that if such a theater is to survive, the unique, idiosyncratic voices of both men and women who write for it must be cultivated and protected.

To that end, the Guild maintains model contracts for all levels of productions, (including Broadway, regional and smaller theaters) and encourages its members to use these contracts when negotiating with producers. These contracts embody the Guild’s over­arching objectives of protecting the dramatist’s control over the content of his work, and ensuring that the dramatist is compensated for each use of his work in a way which will encourage him to continue writing for the living stage.

In addition to its contract services, the Guild acts as an aggressive public advocate for dramatists’ interests and assists dramatists in developing both their artistic and business skills through its publications, which are distributed nationally, and the educational programs which it sponsors around the country.
Through a variety of activities, the Dramatists Guild of America works to ensure that theater in America will
continue to flourish and that the voices which give it life will continue to reflect and celebrate the richness
and diversity of the American experience.
A note to Guild Members: A re-imagining of the Members-only portion of our site is currently in development and will be made live in stages, beginning with public Member profiles in early 2011. All Guild Members and Associate members will be notified via email the moment each new portion of the site becomes available. In the interim, any information you require can be obtained by phoning the Guild offfices at: (212) 398-9366.

http://www.dramatistsguild.com/

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dmoz, open directory project
http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Writers_Resources/Playwriting/
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Playwriting Opportunities
http://www.playwritingopportunities.com/Playwriting_Theatre_Resources.htm
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Play Publishers:
Below is a short list of play publishers. Browse their online catalogs to see if your play will be a good fit before querying. I’ve noted the ones that have contests or other special instructions. Click the publisher’s name to go the submission guidelines page.

Baker’s Plays – e-queries OK, has a contest for high school students, markets to religious institutions, regional theatres, universities, high schools and children’s/family theatres.
Broadway Play Publishing, Inc. – e-queries OK, full-length plays only.
Brooklyn Publishers – e-queries OK, NO musicals, markets mainly to middle, junior high and high schools.
Dramatists Play Service, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, all plays/musicals must have a production history.
Pioneer Drama Service – e-queries OK, has a contest, markets to schools and “family-oriented theatres.”
Samuel French, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, has a contest, markets to amateur and regional theatres, prefers plays/musicals appropriate for family, junior and high school markets, though will consider plays with more adult themes if they have had successful productions.

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The History of Playwrights Ink can be accessed and read at the Madison Public Library (main branch) on 201 West Mifflin St. in the Local Material File (Pamphlet File ) on the first floor. The file lists Associations alphabetically.

You may also access Playwrights Ink History and read it at the University of Wisconsin Memorial Library, 728 State St. It is cataloged so people will know it’s available and can be found and used there in the Madison Archives.

Should you have any problem locating our files, speak to a librarian. No material may be removed from these libraries regarding the History of Playwrights Ink. Please return info exactly where you found it.

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Playwrights Ink Participation: Anyone is welcome to attend Playwrights Ink monthly meetings (third Monday, 7PM). If you want a play or scene read, you must pay the $10 annual dues and contact Bob Curry to get it in the schedule. If you have any issues or concerns about the group’s activities or governance, would like to post an item in the monthly newsletter, or want help finding actors to read your play at the monthly meeting, contact Nick Schweitzer.

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