July Newsletter and Meeting Notice

Our next meeting will be Monday, July 21st, at 7 PM at the Lowell Center, 610 Langdon Street, Madison. Check kiosk for room.

Parking: Lowell parking is for guests of the hotel and staff only. Nearest parking is the Lake Street Ramp, one block south (you can also enter from Frances Street). Street parking is free after 6 P.M. Try east on Langdon up around the curve or the foot of Gilman Street around the corner from Porta Bella, generally our tavern of choice for an apres-meeting drink. Porta Bella is on Frances between State and University.

City of Madison Parking Website: http://www.cityofmadison.com/transportation/parking.cfm

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

Starting around 7:10 we will read:

Love U Forever; Flip a Coin (Act 1) ……………. by Kurt Brown :45
Eureka (scenes) ………………………………………… by Gary Kriewald :20

There is a little room on this schedule if people want to bring scenes or short plays to complete the evening.

* * * * * * Playwrights: please cast the actors who volunteer to read for us first. And: We always need women to read. * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

In June we read:

“A Soldier’s Man” ………………………………………………… by Joshua Biatch
Eureka (scenes) ………………………………………………….. by Gary Kriewald
“Prologue to Orestes in the Underworld”……………… by Nick Schweitzer
“The Folksinger” …………………………………………………. by John Morgan
“Disappearing Act” ……………………………………………… by Paula Pachciarz
“Council for All Earth Beings Summit Address”…… by Peg Cadigan

Readers were: Katie Erdman, Claire Tran, Sandra Reynolds, Paula Pachciarz, Joshua Biatch, Jason Compton, Sam Gutierrez, John Morgan, Ross Shenker, Brendon Smith, Micah Herstand, Mark Lajiness, Gary Kriewald, Nick Schweitzer, Alan Gold, George Farah, Bob Curry

(my apologies if I forgot anyone)

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

Online play submissions calendar. Check it out. Thank you, Brendon Smith.

http://www.submissioncalendar.com/
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Another resource. Thanks, Betty Diamond:

Welcome to The Playwrights’ Center’s Writer’s Opportunities listings, the nation’s best collection of information for working dramatists. We do the research so our member playwrights can spend more time focused on writing. This extensive database of information contains information on contests, theaters, publication and submission opportunities. We add opportunities and search categories weekly to keep the information up-to-date and easy to search.

http://www.pwcenter.org/members-opportunities.php
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The truth isn’t always beauty, but the hunger for it is.
Books don’t need batteries.

— Nadine Gordimer (1923-2014)
~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~
ANNOUNCEMENTS and OPPORTUNITIES
UW Division of Continuing Studies:

School of the Arts at Rhinelander
Sa-W, July 19-23, 8am-6pm • Fees vary
http://continuingstudies.wisc.edu/performing-arts/index.html
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

To Members of Playwrights Ink:
I am working with Friends of Unitarian Universalists and The Madison Institute on a new low-power FM radio station, WMUU. I am the Program Director and want to produce regular, contemporary radio dramas.

We hope to get WMUU on the air in early Fall. The main studio will be located at 122 State St., home of The Fountain, and we will reach a 10-mile radius. Programs will also be podcast.

I am also considering applying for a Cultural Affairs grant to put toward these radio play productions.

Kelly Warren

We’ll keep you updated on this potential opportunity.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Edgewood Theater Department has offered to make its new black box theater available for public readings of plays that have been read at P.I. meetings and that are ready for the stage. If you have a work that you want to have considered, and if you are willing to do most of the work of casting, rehearsing, and producing, contact Nick Schweitzer, who will act as liaison with Edgewood.

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

MEMBER NEWS
If you are in a show, directing a show, have written a show being produced somewhere, let me know and I’ll put it in the newsletter and you may post it on our Facebook page.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Spoke, by Coleman, reviewed in Isthmus

http://www.isthmus.com/daily/article.php?article=41125

http://www.spokesinthewheel.com

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Coleman’s novel Kidnapping Henry Kissinger is available at Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/ Kidnapping-Henry-Kissinger- ebook/dp/B0078PWPDA/ref=sr_1_ 1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331048524&sr=8- 1

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~. ~.~.~.~.~.~.~
CONTESTS AND SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITIES

Submission Calendar:
http://www.submissioncalendar.com/
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Playwrights’ Center

2301 East Franklin Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55406-1099
http://www.pwcenter.org/

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Playwrights Foundation
http://www.playwrightsfoundation.org/

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Playwrights Project
http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Plot-Line—WordPlay–PiP—-More-.html?soid=1102494320324&aid=5N4hi_k4A2g

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Logo
Written and Edited by Lindsay Price
Marketing Your Play
https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/marketing-your-play
~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~. ~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

Articles and Reviews:

Looking Back at Nadine Gordimer’s Life and Work

By JOHN WILLIAMS

Accepting the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1991, Nadine Gordimer, the South African writer who died on Sunday at 90, said: “I am what I suppose would be called a natural writer. I did not make any decision to become one. I did not, at the beginning, expect to earn a living by being read. I wrote as a child out of the joy of apprehending life through my senses — the look and scent and feel of things; and soon out of the emotions that puzzled me or raged within me and which took form, found some enlightenment, solace and delight, shaped in the written word.” To continue reading:
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/14/looking-back-at-nadine-gordimers-life-and-work/?action=click&contentCollection=Books&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Nadine Gordimer reads ‘The Centaur’ by José Saramago

José Saramago tackles the conflict between mind and body in ‘The Centaur’, says Nadine Gordimer

http://www.theguardin.com/books/audio/2012/dec/26/nadine-gordimer-jose-saramago-centau

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Sexual Tension and Other Diversions

‘The Qualms,’ by Bruce Norris, at the Steppenwolf Theater

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD, JULY 13, 2014

CHICAGO — Wait, is this a sex party or a debating society?

You half-expect someone onstage to pipe up with this pertinent question during “The Qualms,” a new comedy by Bruce Norris having its premiere at the Steppenwolf Theater here. The four couples gathered at a handsome beach house for an evening of what was once called swinging are ostensibly frisky and ready to repair to the “party room” for some no-strings-attached frolicking. To continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/14/theater/the-qualms-by-bruce-norris-at-the-steppenwolf-theater.html?ref=arts
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

(stories from previous months)
New Brooklyn Theater Casts Audience in Crucial Role

Four Plays by African-American Playwrights

By RICHARD MORGAN, JULY 4, 2014

The four plays speak to a grim period in American history, touching on slavery, lynching and broader issues of racism. Two of the plays are by Harlem Renaissance writers, including Zora Neale Hurston. One was commissioned by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People right after its founding at the Henry Street Settlement on the Lower East Side.

And now they are being dusted off by a young theater company in Brooklyn. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/05/nyregion/african-american-playswrights-new-brooklyn-theater-casts-audience-in-crucial-role.html?_r=0
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Ruby Dee, a Ringing Voice for Civil Rights, Onstage and Off, Dies at 91

By BRUCE WEBER, JUNE 12, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/13/arts/ruby-dee-actress-dies-at-91.html?ref=theater&_r=0

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Sex, Violence and Power, With a Feminist Slant

By ALEXIS SOLOSKI, JUNE 12, 2014

A few years ago, the British playwright Penelope Skinner found herself in an editing suite, staring at a woman’s breasts. She had written an episode of “Fresh Meat,” a sitcom about college students, which contained a sex scene. The woman in it had just a few lines, and Ms. Skinner didn’t want her to serve as merely a source of titillation. So in the script she’d stated, “She does not take her top off.” To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/15/theater/sex-violence-and-power-with-a-feminist-slant.html?rref=theater&module=Ribbon&version=origin&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Theater&pgtype=article
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Fair warning, provoking a thought is literature’s job
By Kathleen Parker, Washington Post, May 20

Just when you thought American higher learning couldn’t get any more ridiculous, along come demands for warning labels on provocative works of literature.
One never knows when a sentence, phrase or word might trigger some buried memory or traumatic experience. Life is a veritable assault on the excessively sensitive, but somehow most of us muddle through. C’est la vie, after all. To continue:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/kathleen-parker-fair-warning-provoking-a-thought-is-literatures-job/2014/05/20/9cc6635e-e056-11e3-9743-bb9b59cde7b9_story.html

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

San Jose Repertory Theater Closes Down

By ALLAN KOZINN, JUNE 11, 2014

The San Jose Repertory Theater, one of the biggest theaters in Silicon Valley, announced on Wednesday that it had shut down.

The 34-year-old theater had a $5 million budget and typically put on six or seven plays a year. It was slated to present the American premiere of Joe Penhall’s “Landscape With Weapon” next week. To continue:
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/11/san-jose-repertory-theater-closes-down/?ref=arts
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

In Performance: Adrian Lester of ‘Red Velvet’
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/15/in-performance-adrian-lester-of-red-velvet/?ref=arts
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

In a Complex World, Youth Who Have Lost Their Way

The Tribeca Film Festival Begins Its 13th Season

By STEPHEN HOLDEN
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/16/movies/the-tribeca-film-festival-begins-its-13th-season.html?action=click&contentCollection=Movies&region=Footer&module=MoreInSection&pgtype=article

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Leslie Lee, Playwright Who Enlarged Black Life Onstage, Dies at 83

By BRUCE WEBER, JAN. 22, 2014

Leslie Lee, a playwright whose award-winning work, much of it with the Negro Ensemble Company, focused on stretching the boundaries of the African-American experience as it was portrayed on the stage, died on Monday in Manhattan. He was 83. To continue reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/theater/leslie-lee-playwright-of-black-life-dies-at-83.html

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Q. and A. | Playwright Thomas Bradshaw on Race, Porn and Suburbia

CULTURE By TIM MURPHY, JANUARY 29, 2014, 6:00 PM

Thomas Bradshaw’s plays have elicited belly laughs from some viewers and disgust from others. Naysayers have called the 33-year-old playwright’s shows, which include “Purity,” “Burning” and “Job,” “ugly fantasies” and “horror shows.” One Chicago theater critic went so far as to warn Bradshaw to get out of town. The reactions are due to the fact that Bradshaw, who is black, stages outrageous behavior — including child rape, racially charged sex and modern-day slavery — in casual, conversational ways. To continue reading:
http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/29/q-and-a-playwright-thomas-bradshaw-on-race-porn-and-suburbia/

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The National New Play Network is an alliance of leading nonprofit theaters that champion the development, production and continued life of new plays. NNPN strives to pioneer, implement and disseminate ideas and programs that revolutionize the way theaters collaborate to support new plays and playwrights.
http://www.nnpn.org/ about_mission.php
~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

Resources :

E-Plays available for download from Sam French

http://www.samuelfrench.com/store/ebooks.php

 

Winning Writers Website: More for fiction and poetry writers, but all kinds of good, well-paying contests.

http://winningwriters.com/
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Dramatists Guild of America was established over eighty years ago, and is the only professional association which advances the interests of playwrights, composers, lyricists and librettists writing for the living stage. The Guild has over 6,000 members nationwide, from beginning writers to the most prominent authors represented on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theaters.
The Guild is governed by a Board of Directors elected from its membership, and which currently includes such writers as Stephen Sondheim ( West Side Story, Gypsy, Into the Woods ), Edward Albee ( Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, A Delicate Balance ), Marsha Norman (‘ night, mother ), Tony Kushner ( Angels In America ), John Patrick Shanley ( Doubt ), John Guare ( Six Degrees of Separation ), Lynn Nottage ( Intimate Apparel ) and Rebecca Gilman ( Spinning Into Butter ). The current president of the Guild is Stephen Schwartz ( Wicked, Pippin, Godspell ). Past presidents have included Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Sherwood, Robert Anderson, Frank Gilroy, and Peter Stone. Past Guild members have included Eugene O’Neill, George S. Kaufman, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Frank Loesser, Frederick Loewe, and Tennessee Williams.

The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work. The Guild believes that a vibrant, vital and provocative theater is an essential element of the ongoing cultural debate which informs the citizens of a free society. The Guild believes that if such a theater is to survive, the unique, idiosyncratic voices of both men and women who write for it must be cultivated and protected.

To that end, the Guild maintains model contracts for all levels of productions, (including Broadway, regional and smaller theaters) and encourages its members to use these contracts when negotiating with producers. These contracts embody the Guild’s over­arching objectives of protecting the dramatist’s control over the content of his work, and ensuring that the dramatist is compensated for each use of his work in a way which will encourage him to continue writing for the living stage.

In addition to its contract services, the Guild acts as an aggressive public advocate for dramatists’ interests and assists dramatists in developing both their artistic and business skills through its publications, which are distributed nationally, and the educational programs which it sponsors around the country.

Through a variety of activities, the Dramatists Guild of America works to ensure that theater in America will continue to flourish and that the voices which give it life will continue to reflect and celebrate the richness and diversity of the American experience.

A note to Guild Members: A re-imagining of the Members-only portion of our site is currently in development and will be made live in stages, beginning with public Member profiles in early 2011. All Guild Members and Associate members will be notified via email the moment each new portion of the site becomes available. In the interim, any information you require can be obtained by phoning the Guild offfices at: (212) 398-9366.

http://www.dramatistsguild.com/

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

dmoz, open directory project
http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Writers_Resources/Playwriting/

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Playwriting Opportunities
http://www.playwritingopportunities.com/Playwriting_Theatre_Resources.htm

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Play Publishers:
Below is a short list of play publishers. Browse their online catalogs to see if your play will be a good fit before querying. I’ve noted the ones that have contests or other special instructions. Click the publisher’s name to go the submission guidelines page.

Baker’s Plays – e-queries OK, has a contest for high school students, markets to religious institutions, regional theatres, universities, high schools and children’s/family theatres.
Broadway Play Publishing, Inc. – e-queries OK, full-length plays only.
Brooklyn Publishers – e-queries OK, NO musicals, markets mainly to middle, junior high and high schools.
Dramatists Play Service, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, all plays/musicals must have a production history.
Pioneer Drama Service – e-queries OK, has a contest, markets to schools and “family-oriented theatres.”
Samuel French, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, has a contest, markets to amateur and regional theatres, prefers plays/musicals appropriate for family, junior and high school markets, though will consider plays with more adult themes if they have had successful productions.

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

The History of Playwrights Ink can be accessed and read at the Madison Public Library (main branch) on 201 West Mifflin St. in the Local Material File (Pamphlet File ) on the first floor. The file lists Associations alphabetically.

You may also access Playwrights Ink History and read it at the University of Wisconsin Memorial Library, 728 State St. It is cataloged so people will know it’s available and can be found and used there in the Madison Archives.

Should you have any problem locating our files, speak to a librarian. No material may be removed from these libraries regarding the History of Playwrights Ink. Please return info exactly where you found it.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Playwrights Ink Participation: Anyone is welcome to attend Playwrights Ink monthly meetings (second Monday, 7PM). If you want a play or scene read, you must pay the $10 annual dues and contact Bob Curry to get it in the schedule. If you have any issues or concerns about the group’s activities or governance, would like to post an item in the monthly newsletter, or want help finding actors to read your play at the monthly meeting, contact Nick Schweitzer.

Advertisements