March Newsletter and Meeting Notice

Our next meeting will be Monday,  March 17th, at 7 PM at the Lowell Center, 610 Langdon Street, Madison. Check kiosk for room.

Parking: Lowell parking is for guests of the hotel and staff only. Nearest parking is the Lake Street Ramp, one block south (you can also enter from Frances Street). Street parking is free after 6 P.M. Try east on Langdon up around the curve or the foot of Gilman Street around the corner from Porta Bella, our tavern of choice for an apres-reading drink. Porta Bella is on Frances between State and University.

City of Madison Parking Website:  www.cityofmadison.com/transportation/parking.cfm

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Starting around 7:10 we will read:

“The Playwright Wore a Pinafore” ………………………. by Sandra Reynolds :20

Have You Seen This Boy? (scenes 4 & 5) …………. by Gary Kriewald :30

Evolution of a Goddess (part 2) ………………………… by Mark Lajiness :30

Cymbeline (Act 1) …………………………………………… by Christopher Wolter :40

* * * * * *   We always need women readers. Please come!!!  We’ll buy you drinks after.  * * * * * *    

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In February we read:

Have You Seen This Boy? (scenes 2 & 3) ………………… by Gary Kriewald

“Kylie, Evolution of a Goddess” ……………………………….. by Mark Lajiness

“Four Lovers” ………………………………………………………… by Paula Pachciarz

Readers were Katie Erdmann, Ronna Trapanese, Betsy Wood, Paula Pachciarz, Zach McLain, Jason Compton, Brendon Smith, Mark Lajiness, Bob Curry.

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Online play submissions calendar. Check it out. Thank you, Brendon Smith.

http://www.submissioncalendar.com/

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Another resource. Thanks, Betty Diamond:

Welcome to The Playwrights’ Center’s Writer’s Opportunities listings, the nation’s best collection of information for working dramatists. We do the research so our member playwrights can spend more time focused on writing. This extensive database of information contains information on contests, theaters, publication and submission opportunities. We add opportunities and search categories weekly to keep the information up-to-date and easy to search.

http://www.pwcenter.org/members-opportunities.php

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Art is the demonstration that the ordinary is extraordinary.
– Amedee Ozenfant, Foundations of Modern Art

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ANNOUNCEMENTS and OPPORTUNITIES

25th Annual Writers’ Institute  ***April 4,5,6***

Take advantage of services that can take your writing to the next level

We hope you’re anticipating our Silver Anniversary celebration of the 25th annual Writers’ Institute. To help you take your writing to the next level, Writers’ Institute features not only great educational sessions with accomplished instructors (see 1 spotlighted below) but also some very special services. Such as:

  • Agent Pitching. Pitch your ideas to agents at the institute via 8-minute pitch sessions. You may sign up for two sessions before Feb 28. (AfterFeb 28, if space is available, you may sign up for additional pitch sessions-no limit). There are pitching opportunities on Friday and Saturday of the conference.
  • Written Critiques. If you would like a written critique of your first 10 pages (written only, no meeting with instructor), please submit your pages by Feb 28.
  • Critique Groups. If you would like to be part of a critique group (no more than 8 writers) discussing your first 10 pages of material submitted, please submit those pages by Mar 14.
  • Poem or Page Contest. Need a nudge to jump-start your writing? Enter the Poem or Page Contest. We’ll provide accolades and prizes.
  • Advanced Manuscript Critiques. Wondering how your writing stacks up? Send us the first 10 pages of a fiction or creative nonfiction manuscript, the first 10 pages of a screenplay in correct screenplay format, or a poem not over a page in length. Conference instructors offer a confidential written critique. Please submit your pages by Mar 14.

http://continuingstudies.wisc.edu/conferences/writers-institute/

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Also at the UW DCS:

Arts Business Symposium

W, Mar 12, 6-9pm, Th, Mar 13, 9am-4pm, F, Mar 14, 9am-1pm  • Fees vary |

Wisconsin Wrights: Playwriting Intensive

ThSa, May 29-31, 9am-9pm; Su, June 1, 9am-5pm  •  Before April 15: $200 | After April 15: $250

Drama Institute 2014

Th-M, June 26-30, 9am-5pm  •  $375 until May 15; $400 after

School of the Arts at Rhinelander

Sa-W, July 19-23, 8am-6pm  •  Fees vary

http://continuingstudies.wisc.edu/performing-arts/index.html

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The Edgewood Theater Department has offered to make its new black box theater available for public readings of plays that have been read at P.I. meetings and that are ready for the stage.  If you have a work that you want to have considered, and if you are willing to do most of the work of casting, rehearsing, and producing, contact Nick Schweitzer, who will act as liaison with Edgewood.

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MEMBER NEWS

If you are in a show, directing a show, have written a show being produced somewhere, let me know and I’ll put it in the newsletter and you may post it on our Facebook page.

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Spoke by Coleman reviewed in Isthmus

http://www.isthmus.com/daily/article.php?article=41125

www.spokesinthewheel.com

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Coleman’s novel  Kidnapping Henry Kissinger is available at Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/ Kidnapping-Henry-Kissinger- ebook/dp/B0078PWPDA/ref=sr_1_ 1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331048524&sr=8- 1

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CONTESTS AND SUBMISSION OPPORTUNITIES 

Submission Calendar:

http://www.submissioncalendar.com/

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Marketing Your Play

https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/marketing-your-play

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Articles and Reviews:

J.P. Donleavy is Still Standing

By TROY PATTERSON MARCH 7, 2014, 3:19 PM

J. P. Donleavy is, arguably, the funniest living American novelist, but the circumstances of his life and work require a person making that argument to qualify and amplify and clarify certain facts. For instance, J. P. Donleavy is not dead. At 87, he lives a bit like a genial hermit, a bit like a gentleman farmer. He looks a lot like a stately imp, in his red bucket hat and green flannel shirt, as he sits with his back to a fireplace spilling ages of ashes into the kitchen of his stone manor-house at Levington Park, a rambling estate 50-odd miles west of Dublin. Out on the acreage, four dozen cows graze beneath the gray bowl of the sky.To continue reading:

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/07/j-p-donleavy-is-still-standing/?action=click&module=Search&region=searchResults%230&version=&url=http%3A%2F%2Fquery.nytimes.com%2Fsearch%2Fsitesearch%2F%3Faction%3Dclick%26region%3DMasthead%26pgtype%3DHomepage%26module%3DSearchSubmit%26contentCollection%3DHomepage%26t%3Dqry31%23%2Fplaywright%2Fsince1851%2Fallresults%2F1%2Fallauthors%2Fnewest%2F

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Egypt’s ‘Rhinoceros’ Allegory

By DELPHINE MINOUI FEB. 19, 2014

CAIRO — The third anniversary of Egypt’s 2011 revolution passed late last month, and I’ve just finished rereading “Rhinoceros,” the 1959 play by Eugène Ionesco. For someone living in Cairo these days, the parallels between the Romanian-French playwright’s mid-20th century parable about the rise of fascist and Stalinist conformity in Europe and the growing — if not absurd — mass hysteria surrounding the rise of Field Marshal Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi are striking.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/opinion/egypts-rhinoceros-allegory.html

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Text to Text | ‘A Raisin in the Sun’ and ‘Discrimination in Housing Against Nonwhites Persists Quietly’

By SUSAN CHENELLE and AUDREY FISCH

With the much-anticipated April 3 opening of a new Broadway revival starring Denzel Washington, “A Raisin in the Sun” is again in the spotlight — though for teachers the groundbreaking play has been a classroom staple for decades. First performed on Broadway in 1959, “Raisin” last appeared there 10 years ago, then starring Phylicia Rashad, Sean Combs, Audra McDonald and Sanaa Lathan, a production that was later adapted for television.

The play remains a potent touchstone, still speaking to viewers about race, gender roles, family, hope and desperation, capitalism, the American dream and so much more.

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/13/text-to-text-a-raisin-in-the-sun-and-discrimination-in-housing-against-nonwhites-persists-quietly/?rref=education&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Education&pgtype=Blogs

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Leslie Lee, Playwright Who Enlarged Black Life Onstage, Dies at 83

By BRUCE WEBER JAN. 22, 2014

Leslie Lee, a playwright whose award-winning work, much of it with the Negro Ensemble Company, focused on stretching the boundaries of the African-American experience as it was portrayed on the stage, died on Monday in Manhattan. He was 83. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/theater/leslie-lee-playwright-of-black-life-dies-at-83.html

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Q. and A. | Playwright Thomas Bradshaw on Race, Porn and Suburbia

CULTURE By TIM MURPHY JANUARY 29, 2014, 6:00 PM

Thomas Bradshaw’s plays have elicited belly laughs from some viewers and disgust from others. Naysayers have called the 33-year-old playwright’s shows, which include “Purity,” “Burning” and “Job,” “ugly fantasies” and “horror shows.” One Chicago theater critic went so far as to warn Bradshaw to get out of town. The reactions are due to the fact that Bradshaw, who is black, stages outrageous behavior — including child rape, racially charged sex and modern-day slavery — in casual, conversational ways. To continue reading:

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/29/q-and-a-playwright-thomas-bradshaw-on-race-porn-and-suburbia/

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Popcast: Hearing Amiri Baraka

By BEN RATLIFF

Most would agree that the essence of the poet, playwright, critic and polemicist Amiri Baraka, who died last week at the age of 79, is words on paper, and the ideas resounding from the words about black art, memory, racism, class struggle and political power relationships. There’s more to it, though. To continue reading:

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/?s=playwright

other playwriting items on this link (scroll down):

Spalding Gray Prize Goes to Richard Maxwell

Harry Potter Headed Onstage in London

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Some Girls Just Know Things

In ‘Bronx Gothic,’ Lessons About Growing Up Female

By RACHEL SALTZJAN. 15, 2014

Before people are even seated for “Bronx Gothic” at Danspace Project, Okwui Okpokwasili is moving. Her back to the audience, she does a shimmying, herky-jerky kind of dance. It seems like a private ritual, a gathering of forces or, maybe, a summoning of the muse. And it goes on so long, 20 minutes or so, that you worry she’ll knock herself out. Or exhaust your patience.

She doesn’t.

“I want to share something with you,” she says at last. It’s a story of innocence (well, relatively) and experience that grows out of a series of notes passed between two 11-year-old girls, one of whom is based on Ms. Okpokwasili, who wrote and performs this solo show. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/16/theater/in-bronx-gothic-lessons-about-growing-up-female.html?rref=theater&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Theater&pgtype=article

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Mundane, Meet Dramatic

‘Brand New Ancients’ Stars Kate Tempest in a Tragic Tale NYT Critics’ Pick

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD JAN. 14, 2014

The gold-plated cliché that a picture is worth a thousand words is flipped on its head in “Brand New Ancients,” the thrillingly good, genre-bending show from the young British writer and performer Kate Tempest, at St. Ann’s Warehouse through Sunday. As Ms. Tempest’s gorgeous streams of words flow out, they conjure a story so vivid it’s as if you had a state-of-the-art Blu-ray player stuffed into your brain, projecting image after image that sears itself into your consciousness. Both as writer and performer, Ms. Tempest stitches together words with such animate grace that language acquires an almost tactile quality, and the drama she unfolds — of betrayal, disappointment and violence among a handful of not especially special London dwellers — soars to operatic dimensions. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/16/theater/brand-new-ancients-stars-kate-tempest-in-a-tragic-tale.html?rref=theater&module=Ribbon&version=origin&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Theater&pgtype=article

Woman Trapped in Modern Times (1920s Edition)

‘Machinal’ Examines a Wife Driven to Kill

By BEN BRANTLEYJAN. 16, 2014

A desperate life blazes amid devouring shadows in the Roundabout Theater Company’s intensely stylish revival of “Machinal,” Sophie Treadwell’s fascinating play from 1928 about one woman’s captivity in a hell called New York City. That life is embodied by the charismatic British stage and film star Rebecca Hall, in her Broadway debut, so you can bet that it’s going to burn bright. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/17/theater/machinal-examines-a-wife-driven-to-kill.html?action=click&contentCollection=Theater&region=Footer&module=MoreInSection&pgtype=article

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Converse All You Want, but Don’t Expect Connection

‘I Am the Wind,’ by Jon Fosse, Features Men Alone at Sea

By BEN BRANTLEYJAN. 16, 2014

It can get pretty lonely for a guy in the middle of an ocean. That proposition — being pursued with intensity on screen by Robert Redford in “All Is Lost” — is also under consideration in the American premiere of “I Am the Wind,” by the Norwegian playwright Jon Fosse, at 59E59 Theaters.

In this existential acting exercise of a play, directed by Paul Takacs, Mr. Fosse puts two men in a boat, instead of just one. But two, in this case, isn’t necessarily company. In Mr. Fosse’s world, conversation is no guarantee of connection. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/18/theater/i-am-the-wind-by-jon-fosse-features-men-alone-at-sea.html?action=click&contentCollection=Theater&region=Footer&module=MoreInSection&pgtype=article

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Young Souls Portray the Wit of ‘Hamlet,’ With Brevity

By MICHAEL ROSTON and ERIK PIEPENBURG

Published: December 19, 2013

Let it not be said that Shakespeare means nothing to young people.

“The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark,” may have first been performed 500 years ago. But whenThe New York Times asked high school and college students to use Instagram to record short videos of lines from William Shakespeare’s tale of royal intrigue and revenge, nearly 500 students seized the opportunity. Scholars differ on whether or not Hamlet was the most vengeful teenager in Danish royal history. But the young people who made these many short videos demonstrated the many ways they were able to connect the world they dwell in with Prince Hamlet’s tragedy. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/20/theater/hamlet-student-instagram-videos.html?rref=theater&module=Ribbon&version=origin&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Theater&pgtype=Blogs

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(stories from previous months)

Your Favorite Shakespeare Performances

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

Published: November 21, 2013

The many reader responses to a tantalizingly tough question – which are the greatest Shakespeare performances you’ve seen? – left me with a mild case of theatergoer’s envy, which is unusual for a critic who gets to see a lot of plays.

I have run into people at parties who gently — or not gently — suggest that, yes, so-and-so was quite a good Othello or Lear or Hamlet, but (nostalgic sigh, peer into the distance), you really should have seen so-and-so.To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/20/theater/best-shakespeare-performances.html?ref=theater&_r=0

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Hey, Mediocrity, Two Wizards Want You Gone

‘Black Wizard/Blue Wizard’ at St. Mark’s Church

By LAURA COLLINS-HUGHES

Published: December 11, 2013

White-faced creatures in silver headpieces hand out beaded necklaces at the door, onyx-hued for those who choose to back the Black Wizard, navy for those cheering on the Blue. Just inside, color-coded cocktails are served in tiny cups: for Blue’s partisans, a concoction of rum, Blue Curaçao and lime juice; for Black’s, bourbon and coffee liqueur. Later, for some, there will be doughnut holes. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/11/theater/reviews/black-wizard-blue-wizard-at-st-marks-church.html?ref=theater

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My Kingdom for an English Course!

By TEDDY WAYNE

Published: November 9, 2013

His university had 394 English majors last year, down from 501 when he arrived in 1984, but Professor Edmundson said he does not fret about the future. “In the end, we can’t lose,” he said. “We have William Shakespeare.”

— The New York Times, Oct. 31

Shakespeare approaches a freshman at an academic orientation session.

SHAKESPEARE What ho, callow youth! Sampling the succulent menu of this university? What royal repast wilt thou engorge thy brains on, O glutton for wisdom?

FRESHMAN I’m just, uh, looking through the coursebook. Are you a professor here?

SHAKESPEARE Verily, the tome of seminars! I have heard, from the eaves, that the sections moniker’d “Business,” “Statistics” and “Computer Science” are erroneous and not to be trusted. Let me excise those befouled pages…

FRESHMAN That’s O.K. Seriously, do you work at the school? Or are you an alum from, like, the ’80s?To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/opinion/sunday/my-kingdom-for-an-english-course.html

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Love Machines

By LAURA COLLINS-HUGHES

Published: November 21, 2013

It’s the stuff of science-fiction fantasy, but also of high-tech reality: a personal helper robot with the power to process language and the capacity to learn over time, its responses ever more tailored to the needs of its master.  To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/24/theater/love-machines.html

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He Wrote Himself a Ticket to New York

John Pollono Brings ‘Small Engine Repair’ to New York

By JESSE McKINLEY

Published: November 14, 2013

John Pollono said he was knee deep writing a play about 19th-century Boston, the art of dueling and the myriad rules that govern such gunplay, when it suddenly occurred to him to lighten up. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/theater/john-pollono-brings-small-engine-repair-to-new-york.html?hpw&rref=theater

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In Performance: Samuel Barnett

By ERIK PIEPENBURG

Published: November 15, 2013

In the new all-male production of Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” now on Broaway, the actor Samuel Barnett plays Viola, a young woman who disguises herself as a man, Cesario, in order to win the heart of Olivia, a countess, on behalf of Orsino, the man Viola is in servce to (and who Viola secretly loves.) To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/15/theater/in-performance-samuel-barnett.html

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What Makes a Great Shakespearean?

Mark Rylance and Other Standouts Share Secrets of the Trade

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

Published: November 14, 2013

Tastes in acting, as in everything else, certainly vary, but a great Shakespearean performance is easy to spot. You know one when you see one, although it’s probably more accurate to say that you know one when you don’t see one: when the language no longer feels remote, when the humanity of the actor and the character seem indivisible, when the emotion being expressed is no longer veiled by poetic phrasing but revealed by it, creating a shock of recognition in your own heart. To continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/theater/mark-rylance-and-other-shakespeareans-at-work.html?ref=arts

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‘I was, I am not’: Asghar Farhadi’s Le Passé

Film Review: Le Passé plunges the audience into the lonely and melancholic lives of a group of very complicated people

With watching Le Passé (The Past) comes great suffering. Asghar   Farhadi, who previously directed the acclaimed A Separation, refuses to please us with the sex and violence of Hollywood, the sentimentalism of Bollywood, or the philosophical pretence of European art cinema. Le Passé is neither a morality tale, nor a political allegory, nor a philosophical exposé. To continue reading:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/07/iran-asghar-farhadi-le-passe

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Friends, Romans, Countrywomen

Shakespeare’s ‘Julius Caesar’ by Women of Donmar Warehouse

By BEN BRANTLEY

Published: October 9, 2013

A woman’s touch has not softened the hard and mighty “Julius Caesar.” On the contrary, the gripping, all-female, London-born production that opened on Wednesday night at St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn has a muscular strength and ferocity guaranteed to keep everyone in the theater in sustained fight-or-flight mode. (To continue reading:)

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/10/10/theater/reviews/shakespeares-julius-caesar-by-women-of-donmar-warehouse.html?ref=arts

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How Breaking Bad broke free of the clockwork-universe problem

By Todd VanDerWerff August 7, 2013

The A.V. Club

Late in Breaking Bad’s upcoming season-five part-two première, Walter White makes a leap of logic that seems somewhat ridiculous for the man to make. He has very little evidence to support it. He has no particular reason to feel the way he does—outside of one thing he should never have noticed. But it feels right for him to have made this leap of logic, at least to the audience. This happens all the time onBreaking Bad: When examining the actual elements of the plot, the show makes huge leaps that don’t always seem backed up by logic or rational thought, but they’re always undergirded by a kind of emotional through-line that ties everything together. The show, which began as a relatively small-scale domestic crime drama, very gradually evolved into a grand pulp adventure, with super-magnets and murderous, silent twin brothers, and it hasn’t always been clear how the series was able to make any or all of this work. At times, it felt as if the mechanics of the plot should have swallowed the characters whole, but Breaking Bad has succumbed only rarely, and even then, only for a scene or two. How? (to continue reading)

http://www.avclub.com/articles/how-breaking-bad-broke-free-of-the-clockworkuniver,101278/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=SocialMarketing&utm_campaign=LinkPreview%3ANA%3ADefault

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The National New Play Network   is an alliance of leading nonprofit theaters that champion the development,  production and continued life of new plays. NNPN strives to pioneer, implement and disseminate ideas and programs that  revolutionize the way theaters collaborate to support new plays and playwrights.

http://www.nnpn.org/ about_mission.php

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Resources :

E-Plays available for download from Sam French

http://www.samuelfrench.com/store/ebooks.php

Winning Writers  Website: More for fiction and poetry writers, but all kinds of good, well-paying contests.

Winning Writers

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The Dramatists Guild of America   was established over eighty years ago, and is the only professional association which advances the interests of playwrights, composers, lyricists and librettists writing for the living stage. The Guild has over 6,000 members nationwide, from beginning writers to the most prominent authors represented on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theaters.

The Guild is governed by a Board of Directors elected from its membership, and which currently includes such writers as Stephen Sondheim ( West Side Story, Gypsy, Into the Woods ), Edward Albee ( Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, A Delicate Balance ), Marsha Norman (‘ night, mother ), Tony Kushner ( Angels In America ), John Patrick Shanley ( Doubt ), John Guare ( Six Degrees of Separation ), Lynn Nottage ( Intimate Apparel ) and Rebecca Gilman ( Spinning Into Butter ). The current president of the Guild is Stephen Schwartz ( Wicked, Pippin, Godspell ). Past presidents have included Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Sherwood, Robert Anderson, Frank Gilroy, and Peter Stone. Past Guild members have included Eugene O’Neill, George S. Kaufman, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Frank Loesser, Frederick Loewe, and Tennessee Williams.

The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work. The Guild believes that a vibrant, vital and provocative theater is an essential element of the ongoing cultural debate which informs the citizens of a free society. The Guild believes that if such a theater is to survive, the unique, idiosyncratic voices of both men and women who write for it must be cultivated and protected.

To that end, the Guild maintains model contracts for all levels of productions, (including Broadway, regional and smaller theaters) and encourages its members to use these contracts when negotiating with producers. These contracts embody the Guild’s over­arching objectives of protecting the dramatist’s control over the content of his work, and ensuring that the dramatist is compensated for each use of his work in a way which will encourage him to continue writing for the living stage.

In addition to its contract services, the Guild acts as an aggressive public advocate for dramatists’ interests and assists dramatists in developing both their artistic and business skills through its publications, which are distributed nationally, and the educational programs which it sponsors around the country.

Through a variety of activities, the Dramatists Guild of America works to ensure that theater in America will continue to flourish and that the voices which give it life will continue to reflect and celebrate the richness

and diversity of the American experience.

A note to Guild Members: A re-imagining of the Members-only portion of our site is currently in development and will be made live in stages, beginning with public Member profiles in early 2011. All Guild Members and Associate members will be notified via email the moment each new portion of the site becomes available. In the interim, any information you require can be obtained by phoning the Guild offfices at: (212) 398-9366.

http://www.dramatistsguild.com/

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dmoz, open directory project
http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Writers_Resources/Playwriting/  

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Playwriting Opportunities
http://www.playwritingopportunities.com/Playwriting_Theatre_Resources.htm  

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Play Publishers:
Below is a short list of play publishers. Browse their online catalogs to see if your play will be a good fit before querying. I’ve noted the ones that have contests or other special instructions. Click the publisher’s name to go the submission guidelines page.

Baker’s Plays – e-queries OK, has a contest for high school students, markets to religious institutions, regional theatres, universities, high schools and children’s/family theatres.
Broadway Play Publishing, Inc. – e-queries OK, full-length plays only.
Brooklyn Publishers – e-queries OK, NO musicals, markets mainly to middle, junior high and high schools.
Dramatists Play Service, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, all plays/musicals must have a production history.
Pioneer Drama Service – e-queries OK, has a contest, markets to schools and “family-oriented theatres.”
Samuel French, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, has a contest, markets to amateur and regional theatres, prefers plays/musicals appropriate for family, junior and high school markets, though will consider plays with more adult themes if they have had successful productions.

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The History of Playwrights Ink can be accessed and read at the Madison Public Library (main branch) on 201 West Mifflin St. in the Local Material File (Pamphlet File ) on the first floor. The file lists Associations alphabetically.

You may also access Playwrights Ink History and read it at the University of Wisconsin Memorial Library, 728 State St. It is cataloged so people will know it’s available and can be found and used there in the Madison Archives.

Should you have any problem locating our files, speak to a librarian. No material may be removed from these libraries regarding the History of Playwrights Ink. Please return info exactly where you found it.

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Playwrights Ink Participation: Anyone is welcome to attend Playwrights Ink monthly meetings (third Monday, 7PM). If you want a play or scene read, you must pay the $10 annual dues and contact Bob Curry to get it in the schedule. If you have any issues or concerns about the group’s activities or governance, would like to post an item in the monthly newsletter, or want help finding actors to read your play at the monthly meeting, contact Nick Schweitzer.

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