October Newsletter and Meeting Notice

Our next meeting will be Monday, October 14th, at 7 PM at the Lowell Center, 610 Langdon Street, Madison. Check kiosk for room.

Parking: Lowell parking is for guests of the hotel and staff only. Nearest parking is the Lake Street Ramp, one block south (you can also enter from Frances Street). Street parking is free after 6 P.M. Try east on Langdon up around the curve or the foot of Gilman Street around the corner from Porta Bella our tavern of choice for apres-reading beer. Porta Bella is on Frances between State and University.

City of Madison Parking Website:  www.cityofmadison.com/transportation/parking.cfm

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Starting around 7:10 we will read:

“Untitled” ………………………… by Brendon Smith :10

“Live Fast” ……………………….. by George Farah :03

Clippies (scenes) ……………….. by Gary Kriewald  :30

Fathers and Children (act ) ….. by Christopher Wolter :30

“The Brontes’ Vampire Sister” ……… by Nick Schweitzer :10

* * * * * * *  We always need women readers. Please come!!!  We’ll buy you drinks after.  * * * * * * *

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In September we read:

“Fathers and Children” (act) …… by Ross Shenker

“Clippies” (act) …………………… by Gary Kriewald

“The View from Here” …………… by Bob Curry

“Becca, Rebecca” ………………… by Phil Heckman

Readers: Mickey Crocker, Michelle Marion, Jason Compton,Micah Herstand, Ari Herstand, Christopher Wolter, Ed Marion, Colin Cameron, Ross Shenker, Alan Gold

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Online play submissions calendar. Check it out. Thank you, Brendon Smith.

http://www.submissioncalendar.com/

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Another resource. Thanks, Betty Diamond:

Welcome to The Playwrights’ Center’s Writer’s Opportunities listings, the nation’s best collection of information for working dramatists. We do the research so our member playwrights can spend more time focused on writing. This extensive database of information contains information on contests, theaters, publication and submission opportunities. We add opportunities and search categories weekly to keep the information up-to-date and easy to search.

http://www.pwcenter.org/members-opportunities.php

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The best part of one’s life is the working part, the creative part. Believe me, I love to succeed… However, the real spiritual and emotional excitement is in the doing.

— Garson Kanin

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Audition Notice for a production of
Returning Home
By Nick Schweitzer 


Directed by Iliana Rotker-Lynn
Produced by Wilder Theater

A touching play about war veterans returning from the Middle East. Their tours may be over, but the battles within themselves have just begun. Follow them on their journey to readjust to civilian life and cope with their experiences at war.

Performances: January 9-12, 2014 possibly at the Bartell, possibly at Edgewood, possibly somewhere else.

Seeking 6 men (especially young men) and 3 women for our production. Actors of all ages and levels of experience encouraged to audition; auditions are open to anyone in the community.

Auditions will be held on Monday, October 14th and Wednesday, October 16th in the UW Humanities Building from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. On Monday, they will be in room 2125 (on the ground floor). On Wednesday, they will be in room 1217 (one floor down).  No preparation necessary. No reservation necessary. Flexible rehearsal schedules.  

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The Edgewood Theater Department has offered to make its new black box theater available for public readings of plays that have been read at P.I. meetings and that are ready for the stage.  If you have a work that you want to have considered, and if you are willing to do most of the work of casting, rehearsing, and producing, contact Nick Schweitzer, who will act as liaison with Edgewood.

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MEMBER NEWS

If you are in a show, directing a show, have written a show being produced somewhere, let me know and I’ll put it in the newsletter and you may post it on our Facebook page.

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Spoke by Coleman reviewed in Isthmus

http://www.isthmus.com/daily/article.php?article=41125

www.spokesinthewheel.com

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Coleman’s novel  Kidnapping Henry Kissinger is available at Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/ Kidnapping-Henry-Kissinger- ebook/dp/B0078PWPDA/ref=sr_1_ 1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331048524&sr=8- 1

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Written and Edited by Lindsay Price

Marketing Your Play

https://www.theatrefolk.com/spotlights/marketing-your-play

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 Articles and Reviews

Alice Munro Wins Nobel Literature Prize

(interview)

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2012/11/on-dear-life-an-interview-with-alice-munro.html?utm_source=tny&utm_campaign=generalsocial&utm_medium=facebook

 

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Friends, Romans, Countrywomen

Shakespeare’s ‘Julius Caesar’ by Women of Donmar Warehouse

By BEN BRANTLEY

Published: October 9, 2013

A woman’s touch has not softened the hard and mighty “Julius Caesar.” On the contrary, the gripping, all-female, London-born production that opened on Wednesday night at St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn has a muscular strength and ferocity guaranteed to keep everyone in the theater in sustained fight-or-flight mode. (To continue reading:)

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/10/10/theater/reviews/shakespeares-julius-caesar-by-women-of-donmar-warehouse.html?ref=arts

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Stanley Kauffmann, Critic, Dies at 97; Spent a Half-Century at the Movies

By WILLIAM GRIMES

Published: October 9, 2013

Stanley Kauffmann, whose literate, tightly constructed movie reviews appeared in The New Republic for more than a half-century and set a standard for critical ease and erudition, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 97.

His death was announced by Leon Wieseltier, the literary editor of The New Republic, who said the cause was pneumonia. Mr. Kauffmann wrote for the magazine until his last months. (To continue reading:)

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/10/movies/stanley-kauffmann-erudite-film-critic-dies-at-97.html?ref=arts&_r=0

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http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/category/cultural-affairs/NYTimes,

May 10, 2013

13-Year-Old Playwright Awaits His Big Night

By LUKE HAMMILL

Kyle Abrahams had never tried to write a play before his drama teacher, John McEneny, required him to try for a middle school class in Brooklyn. Kyle had always liked acting – he recently performed in a production of “Frankenstein.” Now, though, he’d be the one giving other actors instructions.

To continue:

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/10/13-year-old-playwright-awaits-his-big-night/

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How Breaking Bad broke free of the clockwork-universe problem

By Todd VanDerWerff August 7, 2013

The A.V. Club

Late in Breaking Bad’s upcoming season-five part-two première, Walter White makes a leap of logic that seems somewhat ridiculous for the man to make. He has very little evidence to support it. He has no particular reason to feel the way he does—outside of one thing he should never have noticed. But it feels right for him to have made this leap of logic, at least to the audience. This happens all the time onBreaking Bad: When examining the actual elements of the plot, the show makes huge leaps that don’t always seem backed up by logic or rational thought, but they’re always undergirded by a kind of emotional through-line that ties everything together. The show, which began as a relatively small-scale domestic crime drama, very gradually evolved into a grand pulp adventure, with super-magnets and murderous, silent twin brothers, and it hasn’t always been clear how the series was able to make any or all of this work. At times, it felt as if the mechanics of the plot should have swallowed the characters whole, but Breaking Bad has succumbed only rarely, and even then, only for a scene or two. How? (to continue reading)

http://www.avclub.com/articles/how-breaking-bad-broke-free-of-the-clockworkuniver,101278/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=SocialMarketing&utm_campaign=LinkPreview%3ANA%3ADefault

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Some Playwrights Get ‘Real’

Off Broadway Borrows From Reality Television

By ERIC GRODE

Published: June 27, 2013

Over the years reality TV has included among its many subcategories a theater-centered “star is born” series. Several West End revivals have found their headliners this way, and before Laura Osnes was a two-time Tony Award nominee, she was a winner on “Grease — You’re the One That I Want!” To continue reading:

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/06/30/theater/off-broadway-borrows-from-reality-televsion.html

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Same Couples, Reshuffled by a Mellowing Playwright

‘Reasons to Be Happy,’ by Neil LaBute

By BEN BRANTLEY

Published: June 11, 2013

You don’t always know how much you’ve missed certain people until they show up in your life again. When Steph started bawling out Greg the other night, and rushing him as if he were a tackling dummy, I felt an oddly comforting warmth. “Oh, you two,” I said to myself, grinning. “You haven’t grown up at all.” To continue reading:

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/06/12/theater/reviews/reasons-to-be-happy-by-neil-labute.html?pagewanted=all

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MOVIE REVIEW

Let’s Put on a Show … Someday

Wallace Shawn and André Gregory on Their Long Collaboration

By FRED KAPLAN

Published: July 3, 2013

Wallace Shawn and André Gregory may be the most renowned playwright-director duo in New York theater, so much so that two of the city’s most renowned theaters, the Public and Theater for a New Audience, are sponsoring a series to celebrate their 40-year collaboration. To continue reading:

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/07/07/theater/wallace-shawn-and-andre-gregory-on-their-long-collaboration.html?ref=theater&_r=0

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The National New Play Network   is an alliance of leading nonprofit theaters that champion the development,  production and continued life of new plays. NNP N strives to pioneer, implement and disseminate ideas and programs that  revolutionize the way theaters collaborate to support new plays and playwrights.

http://www.nnpn.org/ about_mission.php

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E-Plays available for download from Sam French

http://www.samuelfrench.com/store/ebooks.php

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Resources :

Winning Writers  Website: More for fiction and poetry writers, but all kinds of good, well-paying contests.

Winning Writers

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The Dramatists Guild of America   was established over eighty years ago, and is the only professional association which advances the interests of playwrights, composers, lyricists and librettists writing for the living stage. The Guild has over 6,000 members nationwide, from beginning writers to the most prominent authors represented on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theaters.

The Guild is governed by a Board of Directors elected from its membership, and which currently includes such writers as Stephen Sondheim ( West Side Story, Gypsy, Into the Woods ), Edward Albee ( Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, A Delicate Balance ), Marsha Norman (‘ night, mother ), Tony Kushner ( Angels In America ), John Patrick Shanley ( Doubt ), John Guare ( Six Degrees of Separation ), Lynn Nottage ( Intimate Apparel ) and Rebecca Gilman ( Spinning Into Butter ). The current president of the Guild is Stephen Schwartz ( Wicked, Pippin, Godspell ). Past presidents have included Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Sherwood, Robert Anderson, Frank Gilroy, and Peter Stone. Past Guild members have included Eugene O’Neill, George S. Kaufman, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Frank Loesser, Frederick Loewe, and Tennessee Williams.

The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work. The Guild believes that a vibrant, vital and provocative theater is an essential element of the ongoing cultural debate which informs the citizens of a free society. The Guild believes that if such a theater is to survive, the unique, idiosyncratic voices of both men and women who write for it must be cultivated and protected.

To that end, the Guild maintains model contracts for all levels of productions, (including Broadway, regional and smaller theaters) and encourages its members to use these contracts when negotiating with producers. These contracts embody the Guild’s over­arching objectives of protecting the dramatist’s control over the content of his work, and ensuring that the dramatist is compensated for each use of his work in a way which will encourage him to continue writing for the living stage.

In addition to its contract services, the Guild acts as an aggressive public advocate for dramatists’ interests and assists dramatists in developing both their artistic and business skills through its publications, which are distributed nationally, and the educational programs which it sponsors around the country.

Through a variety of activities, the Dramatists Guild of America works to ensure that theater in America will continue to flourish and that the voices which give it life will continue to reflect and celebrate the richness and diversity of the American experience.

A note to Guild Members: A re-imagining of the Members-only portion of our site is currently in development and will be made live in stages, beginning with public Member profiles in early 2011. All Guild Members and Associate members will be notified via email the moment each new portion of the site becomes available. In the interim, any information you require can be obtained by phoning the Guild offfices at: (212) 398-9366.

http://www.dramatistsguild.com/

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dmoz, open directory project
http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Writers_Resources/Playwriting/  

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Playwriting Opportunities
http://www.playwritingopportunities.com/Playwriting_Theatre_Resources.htm  

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Play Publishers:
Below is a short list of play publishers. Browse their online catalogs to see if your play will be a good fit before querying. I’ve noted the ones that have contests or other special instructions. Click the publisher’s name to go the submission guidelines page.

Baker’s Plays – e-queries OK, has a contest for high school students, markets to religious institutions, regional theatres, universities, high schools and children’s/family theatres.
Broadway Play Publishing, Inc. – e-queries OK, full-length plays only.
Brooklyn Publishers – e-queries OK, NO musicals, markets mainly to middle, junior high and high schools.
Dramatists Play Service, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, all plays/musicals must have a production history.
Pioneer Drama Service – e-queries OK, has a contest, markets to schools and “family-oriented theatres.”
Samuel French, Inc. – NO e-queries or submissions, has a contest, markets to amateur and regional theatres, prefers plays/musicals appropriate for family, junior and high school markets, though will consider plays with more adult themes if they have had successful productions.

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The History of Playwrights Ink can be accessed and read at the Madison Public Library (main branch) on 201 West Mifflin St. in the Local Material File (Pamphlet File ) on the first floor. The file lists Associations alphabetically.

You may also access Playwrights Ink History and read it at the University of Wisconsin Memorial Library, 728 State St. It is cataloged so people will know it’s available and can be found and used there in the Madison Archives.

Should you have any problem locating our files, speak to a librarian. No material may be removed from these libraries regarding the History of Playwrights Ink. Please return info exactly where you found it.

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Playwrights Ink Participation: Anyone is welcome to attend Playwrights Ink monthly meetings (second Monday, 7PM). If you want a play or scene read, you must pay the $10 annual dues and contact Bob Curry to get it in the schedule. If you have any issues or concerns about the group’s activities or governance, would like to post an item in the monthly newsletter, or want help finding actors to read your play at the monthly meeting, contact Nick Schweitzer.

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